Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

Research Metrics

A guide for research impact tools, databases, and metrics

h-Index

The h-index is a common metric that attempts to measure both the productivity and impact of the published work of a scientist or scholar. It was intended to be an unbiased way of comparing people within a discipline, especially in the sciences.  The h-index is a reflection of both the number of publication and the number of citations per publication. For example, an h-index of 25 means the researcher has published  at least 25 papers, each of which has been cited at least 25 or more times.

The h-index can be found in Web of Science, Scopus, or Google. Your h-index may vary depending on which of these resources you consult because it is calculated based on the citations indexed by each.

Caveats to using the h-index:

  • the h-index cannot be used to compare researchers in different disciplines due to differences in citations practices 
  • the h-index can put early career researchers at a disadvantage since citations tend to increase over time
  • should not be used as the only indicator to evaluate a researcher

Building a More Robust Picture of Your Research Output

Scopus has built-in features that make it easy to quickly find your h-index and create basic visualizations about a set of citations. You can use these features to discover the journals where you most frequently publish, view a network of your co-authors, and more.

Scopus

To find your h-index in Scopus and view all of your citations, use the "Author" search feature to locate your author profile.

Click on your name on the results page to view your "Author Details" page in Scopus.  Your h-index will be displayed to the right of your name


When you run a search in Scopus, you can analyze search results. If you perform a search on yourself, you'll be able to see trends and statistics for your research over time. Click on the "View in search results format link" from your "Author Details" page in order to analyze your citations in more detail (shown in video below).


Web of Science has built-in features that make it easy to quickly find your h-index and create basic visualizations about a set of citations. You can use these features to discover the journals where you most frequently publish, view a network of your co-authors, and more.

See more from Web of Science and their author or search analytics functions on their guide.

Web of Science

The Citation Report feature in Web of Science automatically calculates the h-index, average number of citations per publication, and the sum of all citations (with or without self-citations) for a group of citations. To find your own h-index, use the "Author Search" feature to locate all of your citations to use as the citation pool to be analyzed. Data can be exported to a Microsoft Excel file for further analysis.